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Video Games for Roman History Buffs. The Young (and the Sun) are a Blessing

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Antonio from Venafrum (Οὐέναφρον) chances upon a friend in a Roman alley.

ψ

“Hi, how’s is it going?”

“We’re all fine, thank you. How about you? Already moved to your new job’s office?”

“I’ve only got the first meeting in half an hour so I’ll run away. I’ve been thinking, why don’t you try one of those luscious video-games about Rome?”

“What??”

“I mean … Hey, listen to me – his voice now firm though gentle – you’re a Rome fiend, there’s a whole variety out there … let me see (*reading quickly from his smartphone*).”

“Here we are. Rome Total War; Glory of the Roman Empire; Caesar; Europa Universalis etc. You search high and low and you’ll surely find what better suits you, ok? I’ll rush now, bye!”

 

An outdoors cafe in Rome

People dining at outdoor tables on Piazza Navona outdoors cafe in Rome. Courtesy of Lonely Planet

 

ψ

A tough and swift young man, no doubt.

Minutes later the old man, tired and perplexed, is sitting at an outdoors cafe in Piazza Navona. Clouds are all over the sky, a strange light looming over the ‘Caffè Dolce Vita’, heavily crowded.

Then, in a flash, the sun floods everywhere by piercing through the clouds. Everybody lights up, Romans and tourists now chatting happily or, in the piazza in front, strolling by cheerfully in the piazza once the Stadium of Domitian.

 

“The sun (and the young) are always a great resource …”

.. he muses, sipping calmly, in satisfaction, his classic cappuccino.

 

Look, it is so clear from this angle: piazza Navona is the  ancient Roman Stadium of Domitianus!  (Courtesy of 'An Aggie's Blog While Abroad'. Click for file source)

Look, so clear from this viewpoint, Piazza Navona was the ancient Roman Stadium of Domitianus (Courtesy of ‘An Aggie’s Blog While Abroad’. Source )

About Man of Roma

I am a man from Rome, Italy. I’m 60 and a Roman since many generations. In my blog, manofroma.wordpress.com, I’m writing down my meditations. The idea behind it all is that something 'ancient' is still alive in the true Romans of today, of which few are left.

One response »

  1. Pingback: A conversation with Carla Shodde, from Australia, on Religions, Romanness & Interlingua (Modern Latin?) Dialectics (4) | Man of Roma

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